UFC 239: Jones vs Santos Live Stream

UFC 239: Jones vs. Santos is an upcoming mixed martial arts event produced by the Ultimate Fighting Championship that will be held on July 6, 2019 at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. Background. A UFC 239 Live Light Heavyweight Championship bout between the …

UFC 239: JONES VS SANTOS LIVE FIGHT

COCONUT CREEK, Fla. — Never one to pull any punches both inside and out of the cage, it might be safe to say that Jorge Masvidal is the realest fighter in all of mixed martial arts.

Ask the fiery UFC welterweight a question, and rest assured you’ll get an unfiltered — and likely expletive-filled — response. Should you be brave enough to flash a fighting posture in his direction, as fellow welterweight Leon Edwards found out in March following Masvidal’s breakout stoppage of Darren Till in London, you’ll end up on the wrong end of his signature “three piece and a soda.”

Yet if you’ve followed close enough ahead of his July 6 return at UFC 239 in Las Vegas in a 170-pound bout against Ben Askren, you might have noticed a surprisingly quiet Masvidal (33-13) during training camp. In fact, outside of a recent charity grappling match against Anthony Pettis, the Miami native has rarely shown his face outside of the American Top Team gym.

The 34-year-old Masvidal has all but sworn off interviews in order to focus on his preparation for Askren (19-0, 1 NC) given how pivotal the fight is within the welterweight title picture. Yet, true to character, Masvidal showed absolutely no love lost between him and the former Bellator and ONE champion during a sit-down last month with CBS Sports’ “State of Combat” podcast inside ATT.

“I just want to f— him up. I don’t think anything of him,” Masvidal said. “I’m going to make sure his bloodline doesn’t reproduce or nothing after July 6. Extinction of the Aksren blood by the Masvidal blood.”

Masvidal, who bloodied the face of Edwards during their backstage brawl, admitted he barely makes time in camp to check out social media. He is plenty aware, however, of the constant barrage of trash talk that has come his way from Askren.

“I always thought he was a bitch, but he just confirmed it for me and the rest of the world,” Masvidal said. “Every once in a while my manager shoots me an email that Ben said this, and half the time I don’t even respond because it’s a multitude of corny s—. Ben is not my chick, so I’m not going to go back and forth with this guy. I’m not going to be texting with him. I have enough problems texting back and forth with my chick. Now I’ve got to text with a dude on social media? That’s below my pay grade. They don’t pay me enough in this f—ing sport to mess around with this guy.”

One thing that seemed to particularly get under his skin was Askren’s clowning on Twitter of a sailor captain’s hat in which Masvidal wore during a closeup in the crowd while attending April’s UFC Fight Night card in Fort Lauderdale.

“I just thought it was funny that he would say that [yet] he’s in a f—ing thong with the belt with his little princess face looking like a bitch,” Masvidal said. “What the f— is that about? You can’t throw

from a glass house, but this guy doesn’t respect it. Don’t question my manhood, first of all, ever. Second, you’re a f—ing beta. You survived off I don’t know what.”

Frustrated upon even the mention of Askren’s name, Masvidal promised to make him pay in Las Vegas.

“If I don’t like you — like Ben Askren, for example — I’m going to make him piss blood for a month because I’m going to f— his kidneys up,” Masvidal said. “I want to destroy his legs so he can’t walk, and anytime he walks, I want him to say, ‘That f—ing Masvidal, bro.’ I want to break his ribs. Those privileges are done for him.